All about atlantis the lost city

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all about atlantis the lost city

Atlantis: The Legend of the Lost City by Christina Balit


A magnificently illustrated retelling of the story of Atlantis--one of the worlds most haunting and fascinating myths.

Floating on the emerald sea is a small rocky island belonging to the mighty sea-god Poseidon. Few visit its shores-until Poseidon marries a beautiful woman named Cleito and transforms the island into a rich and fertile paradise, where all things flourish. A magnificent city arises. Poseidon names his perfect island Atlantis. Atlantis prospers and its people live in peace, but as the years pass, Poseidons descendants start to act less like gods and more like men. When the people incur the wrath of their god, a terrible curse is carried out and the entire island sinks forever beneath the waves.

This retelling of the history of fabled Atlantis is based on Platos Timaeus and Critias. It features a note by internationally known historian Geoffrey Ashe, who has written extensively in the area of mythology.

File Name: all about atlantis the lost city.zip
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Published 21.12.2018

The Lost City of Atlantis - Mythology w/ Dael

The Lost City of Atlantis

The idea of Atlantis — the "lost" island subcontinent often idealized as an advanced, utopian society holding wisdom that could bring world peace — has captivated dreamers, occultists and New Agers for generations. Thousands of books, magazines and websites are devoted to Atlantis, and it remains a popular topic. People have lost fortunes — and in some cases even their lives — looking for Atlantis. Unlike many legends whose origins have been lost in the mists of time, we know exactly when and where the story of Atlantis first appeared. The story was first told in two of Plato's dialogues, the "Timaeus" and the "Critias," written about B. Though today Atlantis is often conceived of as a peaceful utopia, the Atlantis that Plato described in his fable was very different.

In the story, Athens repels the Atlantean attack unlike any other nation of the known world , [2] supposedly giving testament to the superiority of Plato's concept of a state. Despite its minor importance in Plato's work, the Atlantis story has had a considerable impact on literature. Donnelly 's Atlantis: The Antediluvian World. Plato's vague indications of the time of the events—more than 9, years before his time [7] —and the alleged location of Atlantis—"beyond the Pillars of Hercules "—has led to much pseudoscientific speculation. While present-day philologists and classicists agree on the story's fictional character, [9] [10] there is still debate on what served as its inspiration. As for instance with the story of Gyges , [11] Plato is known to have freely borrowed some of his allegories and metaphors from older traditions.

All rights reserved. An illustration by Sir Gerald Hargreaves shows a utopian scene on a cove of the mythical land of Atlantis. Many scholars think Plato invented the story of Atlantis as a way to present his philosophical theories. If the writing of the ancient Greek philosopher Plato had not contained so much truth about the human condition, his name would have been forgotten centuries ago. But one of his most famous stories—the cataclysmic destruction of the ancient civilization of Atlantis—is almost certainly false. So why is this story still repeated more than 2, years after Plato's death?

Plato created the legend of Atlantis. So why is it still popular more than 2,000 years later?

The world is full of unsolved mysteries. Despite of the great achievements in the field of science, we, the human beings remain clueless about many things around us. Rather than the land we live, what seems stranger to us is the ocean, which is home to many myths, legends and mysteries. While scientists have succeeded in explaining many of these mysteries, there are quite a few still remaining as unexplained. Lost cities, hidden treasures, mystic ships are all part of the alluring marine world. Of all these, the lost city of Atlantis tops the list. The Lost City of Atlantis, first mentioned by the ancient Greek philosopher Plato more than 2, years ago, is known as one of the oldest and greatest mysteries of the world.

Local legends often tell of cities or islands that have been lost to the waves. Nowadays we are sceptical of these tales, but some of them really happened. In one cataclysmic night, the gods sent a battalion of fire and earthquakes so intense that the Utopian kingdom of Atlantis sank deep into the ocean, never to be found again. So tells Plato's infamous myth, which has captivated audiences for more than 2, years. Many people have subsequently floated theories about exactly where Atlantis was: in the Mediterranean, off the coast of Spain, even under Antarctica.

1 COMMENTS

  1. Humbert C. says:

    The 'lost' continent

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